May 2017

Leatherback Turtles in the California Current: Why Leatherbacks Cross the Pacific

Thursday, May 25, 2017
7 p.m. Refreshments, 7:30 p.m. Program
Lecture Hall, Monterey Boatworks, Hopkins Marine Station
Pacific Grove (Across from American Tin Cannery Outlet Stores)
Speaker: Scott Benson

Scott Benson is the lead investigator of the leatherback turtle ecology program and coordinates studies of the distribution, abundance, movement patterns, foraging ecology, and health of endangered western Pacific leatherback turtles along the U.S. West Coast and throughout the Pacific. His research integrates bio-telemetry, aerial surveys, vessel-based sampling, and satellite remote sensing to enhance understanding of how oceanographic processes influence the occurrence and behavior of this species, and to aid U.S. and international conservation and recovery efforts. Since 1986, Scott has been involved in ecological research and conservation of marine vertebrates in the Pacific Ocean, including integrated studies of marine mammals and seabirds along the U.S. West Coast. Stationed at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, his education includes a B.A. from San Diego State University and an M.S. in Marine Science from San Jose State University.
Scott will discuss the declining populations of the Pacific Leatherback Sea Turtle, which have placed it on NOAA’s list of eight endangered species most at risk of extinction in the near future. He will also be discussing the endangered sea turtle’s biology, distribution, movements and foraging ecology.

April 2017
Sushi and Satellites: Tracking Marine Life in our Blue Serengeti 

Thursday, April 27, 2017
7 p.m. Refreshments, 7:30 p.m. Program
Lecture Hall, Monterey Boatworks, Hopkins Marine Station
Pacific Grove (Across from American Tin Cannery Outlet Stores)
Speaker: Dr. Barbara Block

 

This month’s speaker comes from Hopkins Marine Station! Dr. Barbara Block will be speaking about her work with her talk titled: Sushi and Satellites: Tracking Marine Wildlife in our Blue Serengeti

Doors Open at 7pm for refreshments and the talk begins at 7:30pm. As always, our talks are open and free to the public.

Please find more information about our speaker listed below:
Dr. Barbara A. Block holds the Charles and Elizabeth Prothro Professorship at Stanford University. Her research is focused on how large pelagic fish utilize the open ocean. She and her team have pioneered the successful development and deployment of electronic tags on tunas, billfishes and sharks that enable following these highly migratory fish in the oceans. Dr. Block is Co-founder of the only facility in North America holding tunas for research. The combination of lab and field research has led to a rapid increase in the understanding of movement patterns,
population structure, physiology and behaviors of pelagic fish and sharks as they move across the planet. Block and her tuna team have deployed over 2,300 electronic tags on tunas (bluefin, yellowfin and albacore) in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, and
performed genetic and isotopic analyses that provide insight about physiology, migrations, population structure, ecology and management models for tunas in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.
She earned her B.A. at the University of Vermont, and began her oceanographic career at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in 1979 with Dr. Francis G. Carey.
She earned her Ph.D. in 1986 at Duke University and a postdoc at UPenn. Block and her team have published over 200 peer reviewed papers, and has received numerous awards. She is the 2016 recipient of the Benchley Award in Ocean Conservation.
Block has collaborated with networks on five films, and the newest, Blue Serengeti, has won several film festival awards and premiered on Discovery’s Shark Week. The film highlights the results from her White shark research program, and provides the
audience with her vision for creating a World Heritage Site off North America’s western shores.

March 2017
Blue Mind

Thursday, March 30, 2017
7 p.m. Refreshments, 7:30 p.m. Program
Lecture Hall, Monterey Boatworks, Hopkins Marine Station
Pacific Grove (Across from American Tin Cannery Outlet Stores)
Speaker: Wallace J Nichols

Dr. Wallace “J.” Nichols is currently a Senior Fellow at the Middlebury Institute for International Studies’ Center for the Blue Economy, a Research Associate at California Academy of Sciences and co-founder of several non-profit organizations. He is an innovative, silo-busting, entrepreneurial scientist, movement maker, renown marine biologist, voracious Earth and idea explorer, wild water advocate, bestselling author, sought after lecturer, and fun-loving Dad. He also likes turtles (a lot).

To book Dr. Nichols as a speaker at your event or to organize a Blue Mind workshop for your organization, please email info@wallacejnichols.org.

 

February 2017
The role of krill in the food web

Thursday, February 23, 2017
7 p.m. Refreshments, 7:30 p.m. Program
Lecture Hall, Monterey Boatworks, Hopkins Marine Station
Pacific Grove (Across from American Tin Cannery Outlet Stores)
Speaker: Dr. Baldo Marinovic

Dr. Baldo Marinovic, a research biologist at UCSC’s Institute of Marine Sciences, studies zooplankton ecology and the dynamics of ocean food webs.

Since 1997, he has been conducting surveys in Monterey Bay to understand what determines the distribution, abundance, and species composition of krill, tiny shrimp-like invertebrates that are a crucial link in the Bay’s food web.

Krill are an important food source for many species of fish and seabirds, as well as for the Bay’s largest visitors, the majestic blue, fin, and humpback whales.

Marinovic’s research has led to a better understanding of what makes Monterey Bay such a productive and biologically rich ecosystem.


January 2017
The (Not So) Secret Lives of Humpback Whales on their Breeding/Calving Grounds

Thursday, January 26, 2017
7 p.m. Refreshments, 7:30 p.m. Program
Lecture Hall, Monterey Boatworks, Hopkins Marine Station
Pacific Grove (Across from American Tin Cannery Outlet Stores)
Speaker: Jodi Frediani

Each year, humpback whales migrate from their temperate feeding grounds to the tropics where they breed and calve. However, no one has ever observed humpback whales mating or giving birth (well, maybe once off Madagascar). So what exactly do they do in those tropical waters? Join local wildlife photographer, Jodi Frediani, to learn more about humpback whale behavior when they are far away from Monterey Bay and their other feeding grounds.

Jodi will share her knowledge and observations gleaned from more than 11 months spent on calving grounds of the North Atlantic and South Pacific humpback whales. She’ll even include stories about individual whales she has come to know. Her presentation will be illustrated with her outstanding photographic images, taken both topside and underwater. Jodi’s passion for whales and photography is palpable and contagious. Come learn about competitive ‘rowdy’ groups, dancing whales, singers, and what moms and calves do during those long months when mom undertakes a total fast, while nursing junior.

Jodi Frediani worked for 35 years as an environmental forest and watershed consultant and animal trainer. Her passions include photography, animals and anything to do with water. She first picked up a camera at age 12 and has been photographing animals ever since. For the past 7 years, she has focused on marine species of Monterey Bay, and for the last 15 seasons Jodi has been swimming with and photographing the North Atlantic humpback whales in the warm waters of the Silver Bank Marine Mammal Sanctuary, Dominican Republic. She has also spent time swimming with and photographing humpback whales in Tonga.

Her images have been featured in local and regional papers, in national media such as The Atlantic and Wired.com, on BBC’s “Nature’s Weirdest Events” and in Carl Safina’s National Geographic blog, “Ocean Views.” Jodi’s work can be seen at www.jodifrediani.com.

Please join us for refreshments before the program begins.

Related link:

Jodi Frediani Photography